2014 Spring Plenary Session

Spring Session 2014
Deadline to Register/Application Deadline: 
Tuesday, April 1, 2014 - 1:00am

The Spring Plenary session will take place on April 10-12, 2014 at the Westin San Francisco airport. Early registration is open now through April 1, 2014. The theme of this session is "Academic Excellence: Strengthening Our Core". We look forward to seeing you in San Francisco. 

 

The Academic Senate, through resolutions and events, strengthens the core of what faculty do every day for students by tirelessly promoting academic excellence.  With new funding available for our system, our insistence that quality instruction and service to students are dependent upon the availability of full-time faculty takes on new hope. This plenary session will give us an opportunity to focus on creating and sustaining quality educational experiences for students by reviewing our mission and long standing concerns with uneven student success, the role of noncredit, responses to legislation, requirements for new student success plans and accreditation standards, and efforts associated with the technology initiatives underway across the state.  We look forward to seeing you in April for conversations in breakouts and debate on resolutions that direct attention toward and contribute to academic excellence.

New This Year 

Academic Senate Foundation Spring Fling. On Friday night, April 11, the Foundation will hold a fundraising event with dining, dancing and a silent auction. All proceeds benefit the Foundation’s mission to enhance the excellence of the California community colleges by sustained support for professional development of the faculty in the furtherance of effective teaching and learning practices. Tickets are $100 for the evening and tables of eight can be purchased for $1,000. A special reception for table sponsors and their guests will be held prior to the dinner giving them a sneak peek of the evening’s festivities. Tickets or tables can be purchased during the registration process.

Registration

Early Registration Deadline: April 1, 2014

Registration Fees

Through April 1st

  • Early Full Session Fee with Friday ASCCC Foundation Dinner: $475 includes breakfast and lunch on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, evening reception on Thursday, one ticket to the Friday night ASCCC Foundation Dinner, session packet, and materials.
  • Early Full Session Fee: $375 includes breakfast and lunch on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, evening reception on Thursday, session packet, and materials.
  • Early Friday Only Fee with ASCCC Foundation Dinner: $295 includes one ticket to the Friday night ASCCC Foundation Dinner, breakfast and lunch on Saturday, session packet, and materials.
  • Early Saturday Only Fee: $195 includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, session packet, and materials.

After April 1st

  • Full Session Fee with Friday ASCCC Foundation Dinner: $525  includes breakfast and lunch on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, evening reception on Thursday, one ticket to the Friday night ASCCC Foundation Dinner, session packet, and materials.
  • Full Session Fee: $425 includes breakfast and lunch on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, evening reception on Thursday, session packet, and materials.
  • Saturday Only Fee with ASCCC Foundation Dinner: $295 includes one ticket to the Friday night ASCCC Foundation Dinner, breakfast and lunch on Saturday, session packet, and materials.
  • Saturday Only Fee: $195 includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, session packet, and materials.

If you purchase the ASCCC Foundation Dinner, a ticket will be waiting for you at the registration table. More details are below.

Payment in full is required prior to attending the event. Attendees must pay before April 1, 2014 in order to secure the early registration rate.

New this Year: Academic Senate Foundation Spring Fling

On Friday night, April 11, the Foundation will hold a fundraising event with dining, dancing and a silent auction. All proceeds benefit the Foundation’s mission to enhance the excellence of the California community colleges by sustained support for professional development of the faculty in the furtherance of effective teaching and learning practices. There are two ways to participate:

  • Purchase a ticket for $100
  • Sponsor a table of 8 for $1,000

A special reception for table sponsors and their guests will be held prior to the dinner giving them a sneak peek of the evening’s festivities. Single tickets may be purchase with your full conference registration or separately Tables can be reserved during the registration process. Purchase tickets separately or a table of 10.

 

Cancellations

The cancellation deadline for a full refund is April 1, 2014. Please review the Senate Cancellation Policy here. Any request for refunds received after April 1, 2014 will be reviewed by the Executive Director. Please keep in mind that registrations are transferable. All cancellations are subject to a $50 processing fee.

Call Meuy Saechao, ASCCC Accounting Clerk, at (916) 445-4753 x 107 with any payment questions.

Hotel & Travel

Location

Westin San Francisco Airport
1 Old Bayshore Highway
Millbrae,California 94030 

Hotel and Room Reservations

The ASCCC group rate is $135+tax per night for singles/doubles.

Rooms must be booked before Friday, March 14, 2014 to secure the group rate. The rate, based on availability, is offered three days before and after this event. Call the Westin Central Reservations Office at (888) 627-8404 and ask for the Academic Senate group rate. For your convenience, an online registration link is also provided to reserve your room today.

All of the amenities at The Westin San Francisco Airport hotel aim to create a tranquil space where the traveler can rejuvenate. Their signature Westin Heavenly Bed® provides a deep, restful sleep while the irresistible Heavenly Bath® creates a restorative and calming energy. ASCCC guests can also enjoy a 32-inch flat screen TV where you can access your favorite shows while unwinding after a busy day of attending Session. The spacious guest rooms feature a work desk, free daily national newspaper, soundproof windows, and air conditioning, creating a productive and clean environment. ASCCC guests can also take advantage of the wired and wireless high speed internet at a discounted rate as well as $5.00 parking with in and out privleges. The Westin San Francisco Airport also offers ADA accessible rooms and all guest rooms are 100% smoke free.

Transportation and Directions

Just minutes from downtown San Francisco and Silicon Valley, you have three airport to choose from (San Francisco, San Jose and Oakland) and the hotel offers easy transportation via an airport shuttle bus. Guests flying into San Francisco International Airport (SFO)—just one mile north of the hotel—will find transportation in the area to be incredibly easy. A complimentary shuttle service will bring you to the Westin door within minutes. From here, you can walk to the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) and Caltrain station, or hail a taxi to transport you to downtown San Francisco. Click here to view transportation options to the Westin San Francisco Airport.

If you are traveling by car, please see driving directions, from the airport or any other location.

Parking

All ASCCC registrants will receive discounted parking at $5.00 per day with in and out parking privilages at the Westin San Francisco Airport while attending Session. For day drivers, notify ASCCC Staff when you pick-up your Session materials that you are parking your car and we will provide you instructions on what to do when departing the hotel. For ASCCC guests staying at the hotel, please advise the Front Desk upon check-in that you are overnight self-parking to receive validation that will give you the discounted in and out privileges for the entire stay.

Internet

ASCCC guests staying at the Westin San Francisco Airport will receive a discount rate of $9.00 for high speed internet access in their guestroom.

Presentation Materials

Title Breakout Time
New Delegate Information April 10, 2014 - 8:00am
Student Placement: Predicting Student Success in Courses April 10, 2014 - 8:30am
Unit Creep and General Education (Ge) bloat: What’s a Faculty Leader to Do? April 10, 2014 - 8:30am
What Does "Career Ready" Mean for Our Students: Discussing a Meaningful Definition April 10, 2014 - 8:30am
From Punitive to Instructive: Changing the Conversation on Academic Integrity April 10, 2014 - 8:30am
I'm New! Now What? Pointers for Plenary April 10, 2014 - 8:30am
Distance Education IS Different: Issues with Academic Integrity in Distance Education (DE) Modalities April 10, 2014 - 10:00am
What Local Senates Should be doing in Response to AB86 April 10, 2014 - 10:00am
Your Role in the College Student Success and Support Plan April 10, 2014 - 10:00am
State of the Senate April 10, 2014 - 11:45am
Panel Discussion: State Technology Initiatives April 10, 2014 - 1:45pm
Professional Development College: Leadership Module April 10, 2014 - 1:45pm
Hot Topics in Distance Education (DE): Quality Trumps Hype April 10, 2014 - 2:45pm
Just Leave us Alone Already! ADTs and SB 440: Will the Fun Ever End? April 10, 2014 - 2:45pm
Noncredit Success from Indicators to Student Completion April 10, 2014 - 2:45pm
Curriculum from Design to Apportionment: Enrollment Management at 30,000 Feet April 10, 2014 - 4:15pm
Doing What Matters: Informing Program Decision Making April 10, 2014 - 4:15pm
Performance Metrics and Goals for the CCCs: Making the Choice to Be Proactive April 10, 2014 - 4:15pm
Periodic Review of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges April 10, 2014 - 4:15pm
Faculty Evaluation: Peer Review April 11, 2014 - 2:30pm
Managing Conflict with Collegiality and Cooperation July 13, 2014 - 10:00am

Resources

Program

Click on a day to review program for that day.

Thursday, April 10
Friday, April 11
Saturday, April 12

Thursday, April 10, 2014

7:30 a.m. to 8:15 a.m. Registration/Delegate Sign In/Continental Breakfast
Westin Ballroom Foyer

8:00 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. Candidate Information Session
Poplar

8:30 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. FIRST BREAKOUT SESSION

1. I’m New! Now What? Pointers for Plenary

Hickory/Hawthorne
Dan Crump, At-Large Representative
John Freitas, South Representative
Lesley Kawaguchi, Area C Representative

Is this your first time attending an Academic Senate plenary session? Been here before, but cannot remember how it all works? Feel like everyone knows more than you about what is happening in the state? Does it look like everyone knows everyone else but you? We have all been there. The truth is each of us was new to plenary at one time so we understand your nervousness and are here to help! Join us as we peek behind the curtain to show you how it all works. We will answer your questions and show you what an important role you play in our statewide decision-making process.

2. From Punitive to Instructive: Changing the Conversation on Academic Integrity

Laurel
Dolores Davison, Area B Representative
Don Gauthier, Los Angeles Valley College
Debbie Klein, Gavilan College
Cynthia Napoli-Abella Reiss, West Valley College

The legal decision from the California Community College Chancellor’s Office regarding plagiarism and the option of failing students for a single act of cheating has long plagued faculty, especially when that act appears to be particularly egregious. While that decision is coming under increased scrutiny, its original interpretation has led faculty to develop methods for maintaining academic integrity in their courses and programs. This interactive breakout will present some of those methods and seek suggestions from the participants, towards the goal of creating a “best practices” document for all faculty to use.

3. Student Placement: Predicting Student Success in Courses

Oak
Michelle Grimes-Hillman, At-Large Representative
Carolyn Holcroft, Foothill College
Dennis Lee, American River College
Cynthia Rico, Area D Representative
Ken Sorey, CalPASS Plus

Assessing a student’s ability to be successful in courses and programs is an important and necessary aspect of student success. Multiple measures are a required component of a district’s assessment system and refer to the use of more than one assessment measure in order to assess the student. Come learn how to begin (or continue) the dialog on your campus about the best multiple measures to use and who should be involved in placement decisions. Multiple measures in the context of a future statewide assessment will also be discussed.

4. Unit Creep and General Education (GE) Bloat: What’s a Faculty Leader to Do?

Elm/Sycamore
Julie Bruno, Secretary
Michelle Pilati, C-ID Faculty Coordinator
John Stanskas, South Representative
James Todd, Modesto Junior College

While the appeal of Senate Bill 1440’s 60 + 60 unit cap promise to students and the Legislature is obvious, the challenge it can create for faculty is complicated. How can addressing unit creep and the resulting GE bloat be used to foster honest dialog about student success and the best means of aiding students in reaching their academic goals? How do we balance pedagogy with practicality? Are there other ways to help keep units at reasonable levels? Is there sound justification for unit creep? Join us for a lively discussion on units, time to completion, Associate Degrees for Transfer, and GE.

5. What Does “Career Ready” Mean for Our Students: Discussing a Meaningful Definition?

Maple
David Morse, Vice-President
Wheeler North, Treasurer

With the upcoming institution of the Common Core Standards in California high schools, much discussion has been devoted to what students need in order to be both “college ready” and “career ready.” While a general consensus exists regarding a definition of college readiness, the concept of career readiness is an ongoing topic of debate. This breakout will consider possible definitions of career readiness and what skills and knowledge our students need to be prepared to enter the workforce.

6. A²MEND: Advancing African American Male Student Success in Community Colleges

Poplar

Since 2008, the African American Male Educational Network and Development (A²MEND) organization has hosted an annual African American Male Summit. Over the years, A²MEND has implemented successful strategies to enhance the success of hundreds of African American male community college students. This session will review recent data and current literature regarding African American male student success in community colleges. The presenters will summarize outcomes and strategic initiatives, programs, and activities that have proven to enhance African American male student success, inside and outside of the classroom.

9:45 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Coffee Break
Westin Ballroom Foyer

10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. SECOND BREAKOUT SESSION

1. Your Role in the College Student Success and Support Plan

Hickory/Hawthorne
Cynthia Rico, Area D Representative
Debra Sheldon, Chancellor’s Office

As senate president your signature will be required for your campus submission of the Student Success and Support Plan, and faculty support is needed to inform your campus Equity Plan. Both plans are due Fall 2014! Come learn about the reporting requirements and how your campus instructional and non-instructional faculty have a key role to inform these reports.

2. Distance Education IS Different: Issues with Academic Integrity in Distance Education (DE) Modalities

Poplar
Greg Beyrer, Cosumnes River College
Dolores Davison, Area B Representative
Don Gauthier, Los Angeles Valley College
Debbie Klein, Gavilan College
Cynthia Napoli-Abella Reiss, West Valley College

Anecdotal evidence suggests that violations of academic integrity policies are more likely to occur in distance education courses than those held face to face. What kinds of problems do distance education instructors face that are different from their colleagues that teach in traditional classroom settings? How can those issues be resolved or mitigated so that faculty can ensure integrity in their classes? Join your colleagues in a discussion of ways to promote a culture of academic integrity in distance education classes and what to do when that culture is compromised.

3. Accreditation: The Revised Standards

Laurel
Roberta Eisel, Citrus College
Adrienne Foster, West Los Angeles College
Phil Smith, North Representative

At its January 2014 meeting, the Accreditation Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) released the complete draft of the revised Accreditation Standards for first reading. This breakout session describes the ACCJC’s stated philosophy and design goals behind the revisions and provides an overview of proposed changes. Among the many revisions, the draft Standards include provisions for institution-set student achievement goals, new time-to-completion mandates for degrees and certificates, and increased attention to the role and oversight of co-curricular and athletics programs. In its review and analysis of the revised Standards, the Academic Senate’s Accreditation and Assessment Committee has been working with colleagues across the state to generate a set of suggested stylistic, organizational, and content edits for Academic Senate review at this plenary session. Please attend this important breakout to learn more about the revised Standards and the collection of suggested edits.

4. Legislation and Advocacy: What’s Coming and What Local Senates Can Do?

Oak
Jonathan Lightman, Faculty Association of California Community Colleges
David Morse, Vice-President

Spring is the time to introduce new bills in the Legislature, and numerous pieces of legislation that focus on education are currently under consideration by the senate and the assembly. Come to this breakout to hear what legislative proposals could impact community colleges in the coming year and what you can do at a local level to advocate for the interests of your senate and your students.

5. What Local Senates Should be doing in Response to AB 86

Elm/Sycamore
Candace Lynch-Thompson, North Orange County School of Continuing Education
Ginni May, Sacramento City College
Diane Oren, San Joaquin Delta College
John Stanskas, South Representative

Your district is engaging in a consortia with adult education to plan the educational services for adults in your region. What is the role of the academic senate for the two years of planning to take place? This may sound like one of those hypothetical leadership scenarios, but the Legislature passed Assembly Bill (AB) 86. There is now a budget of $25 million for a two-year planning and implementation period so that newly formed Adult Education Consortia can identify regional solutions to coordinate service to students through adult education, noncredit, and credit instruction. Now, more than ever faculty need to be at these tables shaping their regional and local plans. This session will focus on sharing what academic senates are, or should be doing to engage in the AB 86 regional planning.

6. Difficult Conversations: Handling Biased Comments

Maple
Jeff Burdick, Willow International Community College Center
Leslie Kawaguchi, Area C Representative
B.J. Snowden, Cosumnes River College

The epithet or the hurtful comment lands in the middle of a conversation or class session. Do you let it pass and let it become poisonous and divisive? Or do you address it and create an inclusive environment? This breakout will provide tools to navigate your way through difficult conversations.


11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. FIRST GENERAL SESSION
Westin Ballroom

Lunch

Call to Order and Adoption of the Procedures
Beth Smith, President
David Morse, Vice President

Election Nominations
Dan Crump, Elections Chair

The Mission of California Community Colleges
Brice Harris, Chancellor, California Community Colleges

Chancellor Harris will comment on the issues affecting the current and proposed mission for community colleges.

Keynote Presentation: The Changing Ecology of Higher Education
Mitchell Stevens, Stanford University

Between 1945 and 1990 the United States built the largest and most productive higher education system in world history. Since then, continuously uncertain government financial support, unabated price escalation, greater reliance on student loans, and an accountability revolution leave little doubt that the golden era is over. As with any epochal transition, it is tempting to feel a sense of loss about the past. Yet there are many positive features of the current epoch as well: general agreement that attending college has become too expensive, canny entrepreneurial activity throughout the higher education sector, and productive ferment in national discussions about how college might be more effectively and humanely delivered. Dr. Stevens will provide a broad overview of the changes attending public higher education at the turn of the 20th century, emphasizing points for optimism in California and the nation.

1:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. Break
Westin Ballroom Foyer

1:40 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. SECOND GENERAL SESSION

Panel Discussion: State Technology Initiatives
At Fall Plenary, Vice Chancellor Patrick Perry introduced and gave the goals for three technology initiatives: the Online Course Exchange Initiative, Education Planning Initiative, and Common Assessment Initiative. The panel will give brief updates on the work of each project with a focus on those issues that affect faculty and academic senates.

2:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. THIRD BREAKOUT SESSION

1. Professional Development College: Leadership Module

Hickory/Hawthorne
Julie Adams, Executive Director
Dolores Davison, Area B Representative
Don Gauthier, Los Angeles Valley College.
Michelle Grimes-Hillman, At-Large Representative

Professional development is at the heart of recent actions by the Legislature and the Chancellor’s Office. In response to these calls for greater access to professional development for faculty, the Academic Senate will conduct a pilot of the Professional Development College beginning in June 2014. Come learn about the Leadership Module and how it can encourage, train, and grow faculty leaders on your campus.

2. Just Leave us Alone Already! ADTs and SB 440: Will the Fun Ever End?

Poplar
Julie Bruno, Secretary
Michelle Pilati, C-ID Faculty Coordinator

Just as the faculty were contemplating when to halt Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) development, legislation in the form of Senate Bill (SB) 440 requires the development of at least four more TMCs in “areas of emphasis” and introduces a new degree-development mandate. What does an “area of emphasis” TMC look like? What do the new mandates mean to you? This session will answer these questions and share the various steps that have been taken and have been proposed to minimize potential unintended negative consequences of this legislation, as well as other related developments.

3. Hot Topics in Distance Education (DE): Quality Trumps Hype

Laurel
Gregory Beyrer, Cosumnes River College
Stephanie Curry, Reedley College
John Freitas, South Representative
Christina Gold, El Camino College
Biju Raman, Palo Verde College
Lisa Storm, Hartnell College

There has been lots of hype surrounding distance education. DE has been seen as a means to expand access on the cheap. MOOCs were media darlings, and technology is seen as a magic bullet. Meanwhile, the State of California is engaging in a major effort to expand access to distance education in the community colleges through the Online Education Initiative. Despite all of this hype, there exist the everyday realities of federal and state regulations, accreditation requirements, technology costs, and student retention and success rates that, while improving, remain lower than for in-person courses. What does your institution need to do to comply with the regulatory and accreditation requirements for distance education? Are training and preparation of both faculty and students for the online environment important for student success? How do we as faculty assure the quality of our DE programs for the success of our students? Join the Distance Education Task Force for a stimulating conversation about the challenges and opportunities in providing high quality learning opportunities for our distance education students.

4. Noncredit Success from Indicators to Student Completion

Oak
Susan Gaer, Santa Ana College
Ray Hicks, Santa Ana College
Wheeler North, Treasurer
John Stanskas, South Representative

Community colleges serve all adults, many of whom are not college ready. What is the best way to serve these unique students and how do we strategically coordinate engaging and then educating these adults, moving them from entry to completion? Where does adult education, noncredit, credit basic skills and credit college level education fit into this? How do we best support these students with services? This lively discussion will focus on making academic choices that are right for our students and will include hands-on success stories from the field.

5. Community Colleges Offering Bachelor’s Degrees?: Possible Responses to the Chancellor’s Office Task Force Report

Elm/Sycamore
David Morse, Vice-President
Beth Smith, President

In December 2014, a Chancellor’s Office Task Force Report explored the possibility of community colleges offering bachelor’s degrees under limited circumstances. Senate Bill (SB) 850, currently under consideration by the Legislature, would establish a pilot program through which community colleges could explore such bachelor’s degree programs. This breakout will explore the conclusions outlined in the task force report, the positive and negative arguments regarding community college bachelor’s degrees, and possible responses to the report, to SB 850, and to future proposals regarding community college bachelor’s degree programs.

6. Open Educational Resources (OER)

Maple
Dianna Chiabotti, North Representative
Cheryl Stewart, Coastline College

Senate Bill (SB) 1052 and SB 1053 established the California Open Education Resources Council and the California Digital Open Source Library respectively. In keeping with legislation, the California Open Education Resources Council was established with equal representation from the UC, CSU and the CCC’s. With funding from a Hewlett grant, the council has begun work on selection of courses and on creating criteria for the selection of digital course texts that are in the public domain and are free or low cost to students. This breakout will update attendees about the work of the council.

4:15 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. FOURTH BREAKOUT SESSION

1. Periodic Review of the Academic Senate for California Community

Hickory/Hawthorne
Julie Bruno, Secretary, Facilitator
Julie Adams, Executive Director
Joseph Bielanski, Berkeley City College
Ginni May, Sacramento City College
David Morse, Vice-President
Craig Rutan, Santiago Canyon College
Katie Townsend-Merino, Palomar College

The delegates at the Spring 2013 Academic Senate Plenary Session passed Resolution 1.02, Periodic Evaluation of the Academic Senate, which stated that the Academic Senate should “review the organization’s processes for assessing [its] operations, processes, policies, and programs.” The Operational Oversight Committee (OOC), which was formed to address this resolution, presented a possible framework for the evaluation at the Fall 2013 Plenary Session, at which time plenary attendees provided comments on the framework and suggested improvements. The committee considered the comments and suggestions from the breakout and with this input revised the process, which has been submitted for adoption at this plenary session. This breakout will provide an update on OOC’s work, including a review of the revised process proposal and a discussion of the roles and duties of individuals who agree to serve as reviewers in the evaluation process.

2. Accreditation: Recent Events

Poplar
Kevin Bontenbal, Cuesta College
Norberto Quiroz, Santa Rosa Junior College
Phil Smith, North Representative

This academic year continues to be significant for accreditation issues with the Accreditation Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) draft Revised Standards, major legal decisions and activity, and increased state and national scrutiny of accreditation processes. This breakout continues the timeline of important accreditation events in 2013-14, highlighting the crucial issues in accreditation that have emerged.

3. Performance Metrics and Goals for the CCCs: Making the Choice to Be Proactive

Laurel
Erik Skinner, Deputy Vice Chancellor, California Community Colleges
Beth Smith, President

With the Student Success Task Force recommendations, recent legislation, and insistence from the Governor, the California community colleges are facing the establishment of system-wide measures of student achievement including target goals. UC and CSU did not have a chance to be proactive and contribute or create the goals that make sense for their missions and students, but our system is attempting to take a proactive stance by using the Scorecard as a basis for the required accountability. Join this session to hear about the proposed metrics and target goals, the effect on the system, and what it means for local colleges.

4. Strengthening Ties with Instruction and Student Services

Oak
Dianna Chiabotti, North Representative
Cynthia Rico, Area D Representative

This breakout is a focused discussion on scaling student support services and strengthening ties with instruction and student services. With the advent of Senate Bill 1456 and the implementation of enrollment priorities, many campuses are in a quagmire about how to ensure all students receive orientation, assessment and educational plans when colleges are still understaffed or have limited technological services or support. How can instructional and non-instructional faculty collaborate to achieve these mandates? Are there colleges who have thought about triaging student support services? Are there colleges who are implementing new technological solutions to assist? Do you know by 2015 funding of student services will be allocated differently? Come learn the funding changes to take effect 2015 with matriculation and begin the discussion to several of these questions.

5. Curriculum from Design to Apportionment: Enrollment Management at 30,000 Feet

Elm/Sycamore
Elizabeth Atondo, Los Angeles Pierce College
Marie Boyd, Chaffey College
John Stanskas, South Representative

Recent changes to Title 5 regarding credit course repetition have pushed many colleges to rethink and recreate their curriculum. Current recommendations regarding credit basic skills from the Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) and the upcoming pressures to align pathways with adult education in Assembly Bill 86 may require further reconsiderations of curriculum by local college faculty. What is the landscape of enrollment patterns now? Where are colleges finding the means to serve students given the credit course repetition guidelines? As local experiments with community service, noncredit, and auditing play out, what lessons have been learned? Join us for a discussion of current statewide enrollment trends and the impact of statewide enrollment management mechanisms on local curricular offerings.

6. Doing What Matters: Informing Program Decision Making

Maple
Sid Burks, Chaffey College
Wheeler North, Treasurer

The California Community College’s Chancellor’s Office has been developing a variety of resources designed to improve decision-making in our program review processes. Current conversations are considering further development of these tools that colleges can adopt and customize that will both improve the quality and meaningfulness of our decisionmaking. This breakout will demonstrate some of these tools and seeks to develop input on what types of data and data collection systems will be most useful to our programs.

4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Resolutions Committee Office Hour
Westin Ballroom Foyer

The Resolutions Committee is in! Whether you are bringing forward a resolution to session from your local senate, inspired to write a resolution or amendment on an important issue after attending a breakout, or simply have questions about the resolutions process, we are here to help.

5:45 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Resolution Writing
Hickory/Hawthorne

If you are submitting resolutions or amendments, come to this working session to apply the finishing touches and submit them to the Resolutions Committee. Electronic copies of resolutions and amendments are strongly encouraged and greatly appreciated. Resolutions are due by the end of this session.

6:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Candidate Orientation
Poplar

6:30 p.m. Resolution Deadline
Magnolia

6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Caucus Meetings

Maple
Elm/Sycamore
Laurel: LGBT
Oak: Diversity

This time is reserved for caucus meetings or for those interested in forming a caucus. In Spring 2010, the delegates adopted changes to the Bylaws to establish caucuses in order to provide a forum in which faculty may address academic and professional concerns vital to the interest of the faculty forming the caucus. The caucus meeting schedule will be posted at the registration table. If you would like to request a meeting room, please visit the registration table.

6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Reception
Bayshore Ballroom

Friday, April 11, 2014

7:30 a.m. to 8:20 a.m. Registration/Delegate Sign in/Continental Breakfast
Westin Ballroom Foyer

8:30 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. THIRD GENERAL SESSION
Westin Ballroom

Election Speeches

10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Area Meetings

Area A with Julie Bruno, Secretary and Previous Area A Representative
Hickory/Hawthorne

Area B with Dolores Davison, Area B Representative
Poplar

Area C with Lesley Kawaguchi, Area C Representative
Laurel

Area D with Cynthia Rico, Area D Representative
Oak

11:45 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. FOURTH GENERAL SESSION
Westin Ballroom

Luncheon

State of the Senate
Beth Smith, President

Resolution Presentation

Foundation President Welcome

Diversity Award Presentation

General Session: Placing Developmental Students—Recent Research and Future Directions

Shanna Smith Jaggars, Community College Research Center (CCRC), at Teachers College, Columbia University

This session will focus on how colleges assess and place incoming students into developmental education versus college-level coursework. Dr. Jaggars will discuss the positive and negative aspects of common assessment approaches, including customized exams, diagnostic tests, and non-cognitive assessments. She will also discuss recent research on multiple-measures approaches and potential directions for the future.

2:15 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.  Coffee Break
Westin Ballroom Foyer

2:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. FIFTH BREAKOUT SESSION

1. Minimum Qualifications and the Disciplines List

Hickory/Hawthorne
Kale Braden, Cosumnes River College
Dan Crump, At-Large Representative

Both high standards and regulations require that qualified faculty teach all courses. Senate presidents may have to resolve process and implementation issues for determining faculty qualifications, equivalencies, faculty service areas, and course assignments within a variety of disciplines. Come join us for a discussion about these issues. Also hear about the new Disciplines List Handbook (produced as a result of Resolution 10.09 S13) and up for adoption at this Session.

2. Awarding Credit Where Credit is due: Effective Practices for the Implementation of Credit by Exam

Poplar
Lesley Kawaguchi, Area C Representative, Facilitator
David DeGroot, Allan Hancock College
Carolyn Holcroft, Foothill College
Michelle Pilati, Rio Hondo College

With increasing external pressures to offer students alternative means of earning college credit, Credit by Exam is one way in which students can demonstrate their proficiency of course materials and skills and earn course credit from your college. This breakout will focus on the issues and ways in which your faculty and local academic senate can successfully implement Credit by Exam as outlined in the proposed paper, Awarding Credit Where Credit is due: Effective Practices for the Implementation of Credit by Exam

3. Faculty Evaluation: Peer Review

Laurel
Alex Immerblum, East Los Angeles College
Scott Lee, Antelope Valley College
Cynthia Rico, Area D Representative, Facilitator
Craig Rutan, Santiago Canyon College

California Education Code stipulates that peer review is a component of the faculty evaluation process. This breakout will look at some key elements to consider regarding the peer review process including ideas for the reviewer and for the reflection on the review. Presenters are seeking input from the field to help guide the creation of guidelines/tools for completion of peer reviews.

4. “I’m Never Gonna Use This Stuff”: Helping Students Understand the Importance of General Education

Oak
David Morse, Vice-President
Brian Rickel, Grossmont College
John Stanskas, South Representative

Most college instructors of general education courses have encountered students’ skepticism about the value of classes outside their majors, and faculty teaching students within their majors may also struggle to convince students to take a broader view of their academic experience. This breakout will consider ways in which faculty can both convey the value of general education to their students in general education courses and integrate the significance of general education into their major courses. Join us for an exchange of examples, approaches, and philosophies on this important topic.

5. Championing Quality: Increasing the Number of Full-time Faculty

Elm/Sycamore
Dianna Chiabotti, North Representative
Beth Smith, President

Finally, quality is surfacing in the Capitol, around the state by partner organizations, and in budget discussions as part of conversations regarding student access and success. With increased funding available to the system, the Senate has opportunities to champion the need for more full time faculty. Surrounding the need for more full time counselors, librarians and other faculty are the longstanding issues of the FON, 75/25, 50% law, and the need for technology to support our colleges. The FON is an inequitable yet standard measure we use to mark progress on achieving the 75/25 ratio, and a door might be opening to allow for equalizing the FON. Join this conversation of hot topics regarding hiring full time faculty and a quality agenda.

6. Practical Leadership: Connecting Local Senates with Statewide Events

Maple
Timothy Pawlak, San Diego Continuing Education
Phil Smith, North Representative

Ever been really excited to share all that you have learned at plenary only to have senators at your home college gently tease you about all the acronyms you are using? The very purpose of state Academic Senate events is to provide information to member senates, yet sharing specialized information locally can be challenging for academic senate presidents, delegates, and other attendees. Come join us for a discussion of an innovative, virtual tag-along strategy that can be used to “bring” local senates with you to state Academic Senate events. Other tips and strategies for meaningfully informing colleagues will be discussed, and please bring your favorite, successful techniques.

3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Break
Westin Ballroom Foyer

4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Problem Solving Discussions
Aspen

Attended a breakout session but still have lingering questions? Did not get to attend a session but have a burning question? This hour is dedicated to providing attendees with an opportunity to discuss a variety of topics with members of the Executive Committee. Topics include CCC bachelor’s degree, accreditation, curriculum, professional development, governance, and local senate issues.

4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Resolution Amendment Discussions
Hickory/Hawthorne

Occasionally amendments are similar to others, are in conflict with others or, believe it or not, not quite clear in meaning. Writers of amendments are strongly encouraged to attend this session to answer any questions the Resolutions Committee may have regarding their amendments.

5:00 p.m. Resolution Amendments Due
Magnolia

5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Caucus Meetings

Oak
Maple
Elm/Sycamore
Laurel: Part-time Faculty

This time is reserved for caucus meetings or for those interested in forming a caucus. In Spring 2010, the delegates adopted changes to the Bylaws to establish caucuses in order to provide a forum in which faculty may address academic and professional concerns vital to the interest of the faculty forming the caucus. The caucus meeting schedule will be posted at the registration table. If you would like to request a meeting room, please visit the registration table.

5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Officer Candidate Forum
Hickory/Hawthorne

Come join this discussion with the faculty running for the four officer positions. Even if some positions are uncontested, you’ll enjoy this chance to get to know them better!

6:15 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Executive Committee
Oak

The purpose of this meeting is to entertain “urgent” resolutions (see Resolution Procedures).

6:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. VIP Reception
Westin Ballroom

For table sponsors and their guests, a special reception will be held before dinner with champagne cocktails, hors d’oeuvre, and opportunity to place their bids on items in the silent auction.

6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Foundation Dinner and Dancing
Westin Ballroom: Dinner
Bayshore Ballroom: Dancing

The Academic Senate Foundation is pleased to announce our Spring Fling Event! Our Friday evening festivities include dinner, dancing, and a silent auction. Guests will be treated to an exceptional array of fine wine and savory delights while being serenaded by the fabulous James Todd quartet. Dancing will follow dinner and the silent auction will continue throughout the evening to enable guests to place a bid on many coveted items. The Foundation directors look forward to seeing you at this exciting event! Thank you for your generous and continued support of the AS Foundation.

Saturday, April 12, 2014

7:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. Breakfast/Final Delegate Sign In
Westin Ballroom Foyer

8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. FIFTH GENERAL SESSION
Westin Ballroom

Announcements
Elections begin
Resolution voting begins

12:00 p.m. to 12:45 p.m.
Westin Ballroom

Lunch
Secretary Report, Julie Bruno
Treasurer Report, Wheeler North

1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. General Session Continues
Westin Ballroom

Resolutions

Area Meetings