2017 Curriculum Institute

Deadline to Register/Application Deadline: 
Monday, June 12, 2017 - 5:00pm

The 2017 Curriculum Institute will be held at the Riverside Convention Center 3637 Fifth Street, Riverside, CA 92501 on July 12 - 15, 2017.

The last few years have seen unprecedented changes to curriculum and curricular processes, from the introduction of baccalaureate degrees to local certification for approval of credit courses to guided pathways. While all of these changes are exciting, they can also be daunting to navigate for curriculum chairs, faculty, administrators, and classified professionals. This year’s Curriculum Institute will provide interactive workshops, breakout sessions, and opportunities for discussion designed to provide the tools and knowledge needed to keep all hands on deck when it comes to curriculum and curricular processes!

The Curriculum Committee is excited to announce that this year’s event will once again include an optional pre-session workshop on Wednesday, 12 July, which is designed for curriculum chairs, administrators, and curriculum specialists who are new to curriculum or would like to brush up on their knowledge. The afternoon workshops for curriculum chairs, administrators, and curriculum specialists will run from 2:00 to 5:00 pm. The cost of attending the pre-session workshop is included in your registration fee; however, you must submit a separate registration for the pre-session workshop and be a registered attendee for the Curriculum Institute in order to attend.

Our Sponsors

EPI eLumen DIGARC
     
     

Registration

EARLY REGISTRATION DEADLINE: JUNE 12, 2017

Early Registration: $540

Late Registration: $590

Wednesday Pre-Session Only: Included into your registration fee

** All Presenters are required to register. **

1 Day Presenter Registration: $110

2 Day Presenter Registration: $215

Eventbrite can take payment by check or credit card.  If you are choosing the check payment option, please select other payment options on the form at the bottom right.

Attendees are responsible for securing their own hotel rooms.  Please see the Hotel tab below for reservation information.

FAQs

Is my registration/ticket transferrable?

Your registration is transferable, please contact the Senate Office in writing at events [at] asccc.org (events [at] asccc.org.)

What is the cancellation/refund policy?

  • Payment is required prior to entering an Academic Senate event.

  • Please remember that the last day to cancel your registration without penalty (June 12, 2017) is always posted at the bottom of each event's webpage, and is listed in each confirmation email. Cancellations must be submitted in writing to events [at] asccc.org on or before the posted date. Registration will not be canceled due to non-payment. All cancellations made after the posted cancellation date will be assessed a $175 cancellation fee.

  • Full Refunds will not be granted for cancellations after the posted cancellation deadline.

  • Cancellations made less than 7 days prior (July 3, 2017 to the event will be billed the full registration amount for the conference.

  • No shows, unclaimed "TBA" attendees, and cancellations made after the deadline will be billed to you and/or your college for the total cost of registration and room if applicable to the event. As attendees are permitted to register without funds, we have no way of determining cancellation unless specifically told, in writing.

  • It is your responsibility to ensure payment of the registration fee. Submission of your registration signifies agreement with this policy.

  • Unpaid balances owed to the Academic Senate must be paid off before an attendee can register for a future event.

The name on the registration/ticket doesn't match the attendee. Is that okay?

No, All attendee registrations must match the ticket.  If you would like to transfer your registration, you must cancel the first one, then register the second attendee online.  If a payment transfer needs to be made because payment was made by check, you must contact the Senate Office directly with a written notification at events [at] asccc.org (events [at] asccc.org.)

 Registration Deadlines:

June 12, 2017:  Refund registration less $175.00

July 3, 2017: Registration is non-refundable

Hotel & Travel

ASCCC HOTEL ROOM BLOCKS ARE SOLD OUT!

Alternative Hotels in Riverside

Marriott Riverside
3400 Market St, Riverside, CA 92501
(951) 784-8000
http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/ralmc-marriott-riverside-at-the-co...

Hyatt Place Riverside Downtown
3500 Market Street, Riverside, CA 92501
(951) 321-3500
https://riversidedowntown.place.hyatt.com/en/hotel/home.html

Rates are valid On July 11th to July 13th 2017

$129 Plus 13.195% Tax For A King Junior Suites $139 Plus 13.195% For Double Queens

Rate Includes Our Hot Breakfast Buffet, Free Wi-Fi And $10.00 Parking Rate Has 72 Hour Cancellation Policy When Making Group Reservations You Have Multiple Options: Calling Reservations At 1-888-Hyatt-HP And Mentioning Group Code: G-ASCC 

Or Your Booking Link Is http://riversidedowntown.place.hyatt.com/en/hotel/home.html?corp_id=G-ASCC

Click on the Link Above And Enter Your Arrival And Departure Dates. Click Check Availability And Your Group Rate Will Already Be Populated. If You Have Any Challenges Or Need To Book An Additional Night Outside Your Group’s Block, Create Your Reservation As Is And Please Email Embrisha Adams, Our Hotel Coordinator At Embrisha.adams [at] hyatt.com With Your Requested Additional Dates. The Cut-Off Date To Get Reservations Made And To Obtain This Special Rate Is June 27, 2017. 

Courtyard by Marriott Riverside

1510 University Ave, Riverside, CA 92507
(951) 276-1200
https://www.reservationcounter.com/hotels/riverside-ca/courtyard-by-marr...

Please contact Patti Hughes - Academic Senate Event Planner at 916-445-4753 ex102 with any questiond or patti [at] asccc.org.

Program

Tentative program subject to change

Wednesday, July 12th 

2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Pre-session Presentations

New Curriculum Chairs

Michael Bowen, Ventura College
Nili Kirschner, Woodland College
Michelle Sampat, Mt. San Antonio College

This session will review the basics for curriculum chairs, including the role of curriculum chairs in the college governance structure, the Brown Act, creating agenda, and the basics for training your committee and hitting the ground running in the fall.

New Curriculum Specialists

Marie Boyd, Chaffey College
David Garcia, Chancellor’s Office
Njeri Griffin, Chancellor’s Office
Marilyn Perry, Sacramento City College

This workshop is intended for new or newer curriculum specialists and provides the basics of the roles and responsibilities of curriculum specialists.  The requirements and procedures for submitting curriculum to the Chancellor’s Office, including the new Chancellor’s Office Curriculum Inventory (COCI) and the new credit course processes, will also be covered.

New Curriculum Administrators

Karen Daar, Los Angeles Valley College
Michelle Grimes-Hillman, Long Beach City College
Virginia Guleff, Butte College
Michael Wyly, Solano College

Administrators often find themselves overseeing a wide range of curriculum issues.  With the recent influx of initiatives, the new certification process at the Chancellor’s Office, and the new Chancellor’s Office Curriculum Inventory, the scope of an administrative job can seem daunting. This session will explore the roles and responsibilities that administrators have when managing and coordinating with faculty on curriculum issues, state mandates, and effective practices.

Thursday, July 13th

8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. Registration and Continental Breakfast

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Welcome and General Session

Dolores Davison, ASCCC 2016-17 Curriculum Chair
Jackie Escajeda, Chancellor’s Office
Virginia Guleff, Butte College
Pam Walker, Chancellor’s Office

Over the past three years, collaborative efforts involving the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office, the ASCCC, and the CIO Board have led to changes in curriculum processes at the local, regional, and state levels.  This panel will provide an overview of the changes taking place around the state, both at local colleges and at the Chancellor’s Office, that will enable colleges to be more efficient and streamlined in the approval and submission of curriculum.

10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Breakout Session 1

COR 101:  Nuts and Bolts of the Course Outline of Record

Nili Kirschner, Woodland College
David Morse, ASCCC Past President 

The Course Outline of Record (COR) is central to all aspects of curriculum in the California Community Colleges.  This breakout will provide everything you need to know about the COR, from the elements required to the elements suggested to ways to develop a solid COR as well as providing models and information from the updated ASCCC paper.  (Basics Strand)

Basics of Noncredit

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC Noncredit Committee Outgoing Chair
John Freitas, ASCCC Noncredit Committee Incoming Chair
Chantée Guiney, Chancellor’s Office

This breakout will examine the noncredit curricular process from idea to submission, including the ways regulations guide noncredit curriculum development and the differences in process and regulations between noncredit and credit. Come and learn about these issues and more as you consider developing noncredit courses and programs. (Noncredit Strand)

General Education Basics

Diana Hurlbut, Irvine Valley College
Michael Wyly, Solano College

Every student that completes a degree is required to complete general education.  However, general education varies across the state at both the community colleges and at our transfer institutions.  This breakout will discuss general education at the community colleges, CSU, UC, and other transfer institutions, including issues around “double-counting.” (GE/Pathways Strand)

Creating and Revising Curriculum – Program Review

Randy Beach, ASCCC South Representative
Michael Bowen, Ventura College
Thais Winsome, Mission College

Course and program self-assessment should be at the heart of an academic program review, which can lead faculty to a thoughtful, data-informed evaluation of their courses and course sequences leading to certificates and degrees. In this breakout session, participants will discuss how program review can facilitate those conversations and decisions, what elements should be present in a program review process to make it useful for curriculum review, and how accreditation standards are an important consideration. One particular focus will be the role of program student learning outcomes as an important part of program review.  (Effective Practices Strand)

Roles of CTE Liaisons and Developing New CTE Programs 

Marie Boyd, Chaffey College
Jolena Grande, Cypress College

In 2015, the ASCCC passed a resolution calling for all local senates to create a local CTE liaison position. The liaison can be a powerful advocate for CTE and assists in keeping senates and curriculum committees informed on the rapid statewide developments in CTE. In this session, presenters will explore ways faculty can access the academic senate and the shared governance system to better support CTE program development on each campus.  (CTE Strand)

Follow up to Opening Panel on Changes to Processes

Dolores Davison, ASCCC 2016-17 Curriculum Chair
Jackie Escajeda, Chancellor’s Office
Virginia Guleff, Butte College
Pam Walker, Chancellor’s Office

This year has seen significant changes to the curricular processes at the Chancellor’s Office level.  If your questions were not answered at the general session panel, or if you would like more information, the members of the streamlining panel will be available for further discussion. (Statewide Issues Strand)

Moving from 2- to 4-year Programs at the California Community Colleges

Njeri Griffin, Chancellor’s Office
John Stanskas, ASCCC Vice President
Tiffany Tran, Irvine Valley College

As the baccalaureate program has expanded in the California Community College System, so has interest in how students will transition from a two-year degree to a four-year degree program at the same college or, potentially, at a different community college.  This breakout will consider the advantages of this situation and some of the barriers that would prevent effective transitions from happening as well as exploring options for students in this time of exciting opportunities.

The Impact of Curriculum Decisions Beyond the Classroom

Kelly Fowler, Clovis College
Leandra Martin, Mission College
Michelle Sampat, Mt. San Antonio College

Many times, curriculum proposals are viewed only in terms of what will occur in the classroom.  However, curriculum changes, however seemingly minor, may have unintended impacts on other programs or on the college as a whole, which can lead to disputes that have adverse effects for students and faculty.  This breakout will explore the importance of evaluating curriculum proposals through the lens of the entire institution. (Student Success/Equity Strand)

Vendor: CCCCO/Education Planning Initiative

COCI Pilot Colleges
CCCCO Academic Affairs
CCCTC Product Management

Are you interested in previewing the new Chancellor’s Office Curriculum Inventory interface?  This interactive breakout session will highlight the new system and provide attendees with information about upcoming additions as well as answer questions about the functionality.

12:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. Luncheon and General Session

Reimagining our Model to Focus on Student Completion: The Guided Pathways Approach

Julie Bruno, ASCCC President, Facilitator
Robert Johnstone, Founder and President, National Center for Inquiry and Improvement

The best efforts by some of the best minds in the community college system to significantly improve completion rates have not produced the scaled improvements in outcomes for which we had hoped.  This general session will explore how to build on past efforts and evolve our thinking about how students are recruited to, enter, and progress through our colleges so they complete their goals at markedly higher rates.

2:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. Breakout Session 2

Roles and Responsibilities of Administrators in Curriculum

Stephanie Curry, Reedley College
Karen Daar, Los Angeles Valley College
Virginia Guleff, Butte College

Curriculum is the purview of the academic senate and therefore of the faculty.  However, administrators play a supporting role to faculty in curriculum processes and are responsible for ensuring that curriculum is legally compliant and can be supported by the college. During this breakout, current CIOs and deans will discuss how they view their roles in supporting the curriculum process.  (Basics Strand)

Financial Aid and Curriculum

Kelly Fowler, Clovis College
Tim Bonnel, Chancellor’s Office
Michael Wyly, Solano College

Many curriculum committees are unaware of the implications that curricular changes may have for financial aid, including unit totals, awarding of certificates, financial aid requirements, and the like.  This session will cover the major areas of financial aid that can be impacted by curriculum and discuss ways to ensure that students have access to the aid that they need to continue their educations.  (Statewide Issues Strand)

UC Transfer Pathways

Ken Barish, University of California, Riverside
Monica Lin, University of California Office of the President
John Stanskas, ASCCC Vice President

In 2015-16, the University of California announced the creation of new UC Transfer Pathways for each of UC’s 21 most popular majors for transfer students.  UC has also initiated a pilot program for participating in C-ID.  This breakout will provide an overview of the UC Transfer Pathways and the progress towards achieving their intended goal of expanding access to the University of California for CCC students.  (GE/Pathways Strand)

Curriculum and Public Documents (Catalogs, Class Schedules)

Ginni May, ASCCC Area A Representative
Marilyn Perry, Sacramento City College
Michelle Sampat, Mt. San Antonio College

Colleges must follow state and accreditation requirements pertaining to public availability of curriculum and course offerings. In this breakout, presenters will discuss the relationship between curriculum and the college catalog, class schedule, and campus publications as well as the need for accuracy and consistency among public documents. The session is intended to share information, facilitate dialogue, and allow attendees to learn from each other. New curriculum chairs, administrators, curriculum committee members, curriculum specialists, or those simply in need of a refresher may find this breakout to be of interest.  (Effective Practices Strand)

Using Design Standards in Online Education to Address Equity Gaps

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC North Representative
Cynthia Reiss, West Valley College
LeBaron Woodyard, Dean, Educational Programs and Professional Development, CCCCO

Colleges are expected to identify and address equity gaps among their students.  Addressing equity gaps in distance education presents special challenges, but also opportunities, due to the nature of the online education.  This breakout explores equity issues in distance education and how sound instructional design standards can be used as a means to help a college address distance education equity issues.  (Student Success/Equity Strand)

Follow Up to General Session on Pathways

Julie Bruno, ASCCC President
Robert Johnstone, National Center for Inquiry and Improvement

This follow up to the general session on Pathways with Rob Johnstone will allow attendees to ask more in-depth questions about the Guided Pathways Approach.  (Student Success/Equity Strand)

OER and Zero Textbook Cost Degrees

Julie Adams, ASCCC Executive Director
Alex Mata, San Diego Miramar College
Mara Sanft, San Diego Miramar College
Duane Short, San Diego Miramar College

This session will cover the ways Open Educational Resources (OER) can promote equity by cutting costs, enhance learning by utilizing more diverse materials, and free faculty from the grind of using a traditional textbook.  Presenters will discuss specific examples of how they have utilized OER in their own classrooms while maintaining compliance with copyright laws, curriculum processes, and articulation agreements.

Collaborative Programs and CTE Curriculum

Dolores Davison, ASCCC 2016-7 Curriculum Chair
Jackie Escajeda, Chancellor’s Office
Kim Schenk, Diablo Valley College
Lorraine Slattery-Farrell, ASCCC South Representative

Collaborative programs between colleges and districts in a region can serve as a way to expand CTE degree and certificate options for students who may not otherwise have access to the courses needed for completion.  This breakout explores models and effective for establishing collaborative programs.  (CTE Strand)

3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Coffee Break

4:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Breakout Session 3

Placing Courses in Disciplines

John Freitas, ASCCC Treasurer
Craig Rutan, ASCCC 2017-18 Curriculum Chair

Placing courses into disciplines is one of the most confusing tasks that curriculum committees face, and it becomes even more difficult when no corresponding discipline title can be found in the Disciplines List.  This breakout will cover the requirements and the major questions to ask when placing courses in a discipline.  (Basics Strand)

Explaining Faculty Purview to External Stakeholders and Boards

Stephanie Curry, Reedley College
Michelle Sampat, Mt. San Antonio College
John Stanskas, ASCCC Vice President  

Collegial Consultation regarding curriculum is one of the 10+1 areas of faculty purview under Title 5.  However, many local board members and other interested parties may not be fully versed in the details of the California community college governance structure and therefore may find themselves questioning faculty’s role.  This breakout will focus on communicating the role, rights, and responsibilities of faculty to board members and other interested parties.  (Statewide Issues Strand)

Local Degrees, Graduation Requirements, and GE Patterns

Marie Boyd, Chaffey College
Julie Bruno, ASCCC President
Erik Shearer, Napa Valley College

With the implementation of SB 1440 (2010, Padilla) and SB 440 (2013, Padilla), which require colleges to create and offer associate degrees for transfer (ADTs), many colleges are questioning the reason for keeping their local degrees, as well as the purpose of other local requirements.  This breakout will examine the purposes local degrees can serve, whether they should be eliminated in the wake of the ADTs, and what kinds of questions should colleges be asking about local degrees. (GE/Pathways Strand)

Creating a Path to Success: Inmate Education and Formerly Incarcerated Students

Julie Adams, ASCCC Executive Director
Dolores Davison, ASCCC 2016-17 Curriculum Chair
Pam Walker, Chancellor’s Office

This breakout will explore the need to educate California’s prison populations, how community colleges are currently creating educational programs for incarcerated and formally incarcerated students, and how local colleges can begin to build capacity to serve this growing California population. Participants will hear from individuals who have benefited from a California community college education as well as learn which services are critical for this student population to successfully transition from prison to a contributing member of society. Come and learn how you can begin the discussions on your campus about serving this population of students who are already on our campuses.  (Student Success/Equity Strand)

CTE Curriculum Basics

Dianna Chiabotti, Napa Valley College
Lorraine Slattery-Farrell, ASCCC South Representative

Curriculum is curriculum, regardless of discipline, but career technical education (CTE) courses and programs can have additional steps within the curricular process. Learn the important elements to consider when moving new CTE curriculum from concept to completion.  (CTE Strand)

Beginning Noncredit Programs and Moving from Credit to Noncredit

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC North Representative
Ginni May, ASCCC North Representative
Jan Young, Glendale College

With the recent equalization of Career Development and College Preparation (CDCP) noncredit apportionment with that of credit courses, interest has increased at many colleges in creating or expanding noncredit offerings.  Come to this breakout to learn about noncredit programs and what is involved in the creation of a noncredit program.  (Noncredit Strand)

Creating Curriculum Handbooks

Michael Bowen, Ventura College
Nili Kirschner, Woodland College
Marilyn Perry, Sacramento City College

This session will examine what a curriculum handbook is and what it is good for. Attendees will learn about the benefits of a curriculum handbook and the “how-to” of creating a curriculum handbook for their colleges.  (Effective Practices Strand)

Achieving the Balance Between Academic Freedom and Compliance

Michelle Grimes-Hillman, Long Beach City College
David Morse, ASCCC Past President
Monica Zarske, Santa Ana College

Title 5 §55002 requires that all instructors follow the official Course Outline of Record (COR) across all course sections taught. Additionally, the COR is the basis for many important processes: establishing articulation and transfer agreements, C-ID approval, creating degrees and certificates, and establishing and reviewing prerequisites. Clearly the integrity of the COR is imperative, but likewise important is that each faculty member be allowed to determine the ways his or her courses will be taught.  Join us for a discussion of the relationship between the COR and academic freedom and of ways to ensure that the two do not conflict.  (Effective Practices Strand)

5:15 p.m. Dinner on Your Own

Friday, July 14th

8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Breakout Session 4

Training the Curriculum Committee

Dolores Davison, ASCCC 2016-17 Curriculum Chair
Jackie Escajeda, Chancellor’s Office
Nili Kirschner, Woodland College

For the curriculum committee to function well, its members need to know the guidelines and standards of their local curriculum process, relevant Title 5 and education code regulations and statutes, where their authority rests, and the roles and responsibilities of each member of the committee.  This breakout explores the basic information that every curriculum committee member needs to know in order to be an effective participant in this committee. Participants will be able to use this presentation as the basis for similar presentations to their local curriculum committees.  (Basics Strand)

Curriculum and Accreditation

Stephanie Curry, Reedley College
Stephanie Droker, Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges
Ginni May, ASCCC North Representative

Curriculum is a key component of the accreditation standards, and the relationship between curriculum and accreditation is essential for understanding the accreditation process.  In this breakout, learn about the interplay of curriculum requirements in relation to the requirements of accreditation and changes occurring in the accreditation process going forward.  (Statewide Issues Strand)

Working with Your Regional Consortia

Karen Daar, Los Angeles Valley College
Julie Pekhonen, Riverside City College
Lorraine Slattery-Farrell, ASCCC South Representative

Deputy Sector Navigators (DSNs) are supposed to help a college identify which CTE programs are needed in a region. This breakout will examine the program review process for CTE and the roles of regional consortia and advisory boards. Presenters will discuss how to effectively work with your regional consortia, advisory boards, and DSN.   (CTE Strand)

Succession Planning and Attracting New Faculty

Michael Wyly, Solano College
Monica Zarske, Santa Ana College

Many local academic senates have a process for recruiting and grooming faculty to prepare them to serve on the academic senate and in leadership roles such as curriculum chair. The depth and breadth of knowledge needed to be an effective curriculum chair is extensive. In this breakout, attendees will have an opportunity to learn about and engage in dialog regarding succession planning for the curriculum chair.  (Basics Strand)

Curriculum Development and Serving Students with Disabilities

Randy Beach, ASCCC South Representative
LaTonya Parker, ASCCC At-Large Representative

At this breakout, attendees will learn about the requirements, resources, and common practices for successfully meeting the needs of students with disabilities through effective curriculum design.  Presenters will discuss academic accommodations and ways to assess learning materials and assignments for accessibility as well as resources that are available to assist faculty in designing and delivering curriculum that can effectively be used by all students.  (Student Success/Equity Strand)

Ensuring Proper Placement of Students

Andrew LaManque, Foothill College
Craig Rutan, ASCCC 2017-18 Curriculum Chair

From placement tests to high school transcript data, colleges are using various techniques to place students into courses in mathematics, English, and English as a Second Language (ESL). Projects like the Multiple Measures Assessment Project (MMAP) and the Common Assessment Initiative (CAI) have been working hard to develop and research new placement tools that will serve the unique student population of the California community colleges. Join us for a discussion of different measures that can be used to effectively place students into courses and increase the chances of success.  (Student Success/Equity Strand)

Program Viability

Marie Boyd, Chaffey College
Julie Bruno, ASCCC President
Jolena Grande, Cypress College

The recent focus on the requirements of career technical education (CTE) programs to demonstrate biannually their efficacy to train students for employment and the implementation of incentive funding for CTE programs has also placed a stronger focus on viability of all programs throughout the college.  Whether colleges are developing new programs or evaluating and updating existing ones, each college is required to have a program viability process that is both effective and collegial and addresses all types of programs.  This session will provide participants with strategies to consider when reviewing programs using evidence-based analysis.  (Effective Practices Strand)

Counseling, Articulation, and Curriculum

Dave Degroot, Allan Hancock College
Michelle Sampat, Mt. San Antonio College
Tiffany Tran, Irvine Valley College

This session will examine the roles counseling faculty and articulation officers play in curriculum design and approval processes and ways that involving these key players can make processes more streamlined. Come and learn why and how these faculty members should be an integral part of the college curriculum processes.  (GE/Pathways Strand)

10:15 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Coffee Break

10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Breakout Session 5

The Credit Hour

Michelle Sampat, Mt. San Antonio College
Erik Shearer, Napa Valley College

The relationship between student learning hours and credit hours or units has been a topic of significant discussion.  This breakout will examine definitions of the credit hour, including how it is defined for college programs such as work experience, directed clinical study, and clock hour programs.  (Basics Strand)

Aligning TOP Codes Project

Toni Parsons, San Diego Mesa College
Craig Rutan, ASCCC 2017-18 Curriculum Chair

Attempts to compare data with similar programs across the state and determination of when programs at different colleges would lead to similar professions often begin by looking for programs with the same Taxonomy of Programs (TOP) code. Many colleges have found that little to no uniformity exists in the TOP codes used by career technical education programs, which makes comparing similar programs frustrating. Join us for an update on a project involving ASCCC, WestEd, and Centers for Excellence to assist colleges with identifying the best codes for each program. (Statewide Issues Strand)

Course Substitutions and Reciprocity in Local Degrees and Certificates, ADTs, and General Education

Randy Beach, ASCCC South Representative
Dave Degroot, Allan Hancock College

The number of requests for course reciprocity among community colleges is increasing throughout the state due to the number of students that attend more than one college. In this breakout, attendees will learn how to implement effectively a reciprocity process that can eliminate barriers for students while at the same time cut the cost of higher education and reduce the necessity of course repetition.  (GE/Pathways Strand)

Prerequisites

Ginni May, ASCCC North Representative
David Morse, ASCCC Past President
Michael Wyly, Solano College

Questions about prerequisites, co-requisites, and advisories are causing confusion at many colleges, as colleges that use content review to establish prerequisites in reading, written expression, and mathematics are required to develop an implementation plan that includes assessment of the impact on students, in particular whether or not disproportionate impacts on specific populations of students are observed. This breakout explores how the process is working in different settings, the critical steps necessary for local implementation, and tools and resources participants can take back to their campuses to begin the discussion locally.  (Effective Practices Strand)

Effective Practices for Creating and Using Certificates

Patti Blank, Chancellor’s Office
Kim Schenk, Diablo Valley College
Lorraine Slattery-Farrell, ASCCC South Representative

With the use of certificates as part of the 17% incentivized funding coming through the $200 million in Doing What Matters monies, interest in low unit certificates is at an all time high. Come to this breakout to discuss effective practices for the development and implementation of low unit certificates, including the roles can certificates play in increasing student completion and what kinds of certificates are appropriate.  (CTE Strand)

Legislative Issues and Curriculum 

John Freitas, ASCCC Treasurer
Cynthia Reiss, West Valley College
John Stanskas, ASCCC Vice President

In recent years, the legislature has become more involved in trying to change curriculum processes and results through legislation.  This breakout will explore what can be done to educate campuses and faculty about concerns regarding these legislative mandates, and what is coming in the next year.  Presenters will discuss the upcoming areas of legislative interest in regards to curriculum.  (Statewide Issues Strand)

Curriculum and Emotions: Solving Problems and Resolving Conflicts

Michael Bowen, Ventura College
Julie Bruno, ASCCC President
Michelle Grimes-Hillman, Long Beach City College

Running an effective meeting and getting work done challenges even the most talented curriculum chair.  Chairs must be able to resolve conflict within the committee, ensure that processes are effective and fair, and deal with individuals that might be a challenge.  This breakout explores effective practices for communication before, during, and after curriculum meetings. (Effective Practices Strand)

Credit for Prior Learning

Dolores Davison, ASCCC 2016-17 Curriculum Chair
Chantée Guiney, Chancellor’s Office
Barbara Illowsky, Online Education Initiative

As more students are arriving at colleges with experience from prior work or military service, colleges are confronting the question of how to award college credit that is appropriate and accurately reflects the prior experience.  The Online Education Initiative and the ASCCC, in conjunction with a work group from the Chancellor’s Office, are exploring models whereby students can receive credit without compromising the overall integrity of a program.  This breakout will update attendees about these efforts, along with a discussion of how colleges may want to begin to look at the question of credit for prior learning. (Equity Strand)

12:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. Luncheon and General Session

The State of the Curriculum:  Past, Present, and Future

Dolores Davison, ASCCC 2016-17 Curriculum Chair
Craig Rutan, ASCCC 2017-18 Curriculum Chair

Partner Presentation: eLumen

Civic Engagement Across Curriculum:  Protecting the Learning Environment

Randy Beach, ASCCC South Representative
Martin Ramey, Mt. San Antonio College
Cynthia Reiss, West Valley College
Michelle Sampat, Mt. San Antonio College

Academic freedom and academic integrity, both academic and professional matters, celebrate and protect teaching and learning through free inquiry and the exchange of ideas. Our commitment to inclusivity, dignity and respect for our diverse student body, faculty, and staff celebrates and protects the core values of academic freedom, wherein we may challenge ideas without threat or fear of retaliation, including actions on the part of the college or the government, regardless of gender identification, sexual orientation, nationality, language, disability, immigration status, ethnicity, or faith. Given the recent national focus on immigration and immigration status as well as attacks on reforms and protections for some of our most vulnerable students, many colleges have worked to engage our communities in civic discourse to safeguard the learning environment. This session will explore various strategies, approaches, and challenges considered by local senates across the state. 

2:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. Breakout Session 6

Placing courses in disciplines (Repeated from Breakout Three)

John Freitas, ASCCC Treasurer
Craig Rutan, ASCCC 2017-18 Curriculum Chair

Placing courses into disciplines is one of the most confusing tasks that curriculum committees face, and it becomes even more difficult when no corresponding discipline title can be found in the Disciplines List.  This breakout will cover the requirements and the major questions to ask when placing courses in a discipline.  (Basics Strand)

Educational Program Development, AB 1985, the ASCSU QRTF, and Intermediate Algebra Competency – What are they, what has been done, and what’s next?

Raul Arambula, Chancellor’s Office
Randy Beach, ASCCC South Representative
Ginni May, ASCCC North Representative
John Stanskas, ASCCC Vice President

Participants will be updated about the latest work of the ASCCC Educational Policies Committee and the Intersegmental Curriculum Workgroup and have an opportunity to join their colleagues in an informed discussion of what lies ahead. Topics will include the state of the paper on Effective Practices for Educational Program Development (Resolution 9.02 Spring 2016), Advanced Placement Examination General Education Credit Policy (AB 1985, Williams, 2016), and the Academic Senate of the California State University Quantitative Reasoning Task Force Report and Recommendations (Resolution 15.01 Fall 2016).    (GE/Pathways Strand)

Distance Education Regular and Effective Contact Practices

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC North Representative
Dolores Davison, ASCCC 2016-17 Curriculum Chair
Michael Heumann, Imperial Valley College

Curriculum committees are required to separately approve all proposals for distance education courses to ensure that online instruction is delivered through regular and effective contact (Title 5 §55204 and U.S.  Department of Education 34 C.F.R. §602.3).  This breakout explores effective practices for regular and effective contact and how to train curriculum committees to critically review distance education proposals for instructional methods that ensure regular and effective contact.  (Effective Practices Strand)

Opening Access, Increasing Success, and Confronting Inequity:  The Case for Establishing Co-requisites and Multiple Measures Placement in Transfer-level Math and English

Tammi Marshall, Cuyamaca College
Joshua Scott, Solano College
Michael Wyly, Solano College

In the last several years, co-requisite models and using high school performance as the primary method of multiple-measures placement have captured national attention due to their effectiveness in increasing completion of college math and English and decreasing troubling equity gaps in the attainment of these outcomes.  Several community colleges in California have also incorporated both multiple measures placement and co-requisite support in their transfer-level composition and math classes, and in doing so they have transformed the academic trajectory and experience for the majority of their students and significantly decreased disproportionate impact.   The presenters will share the rationale for these changes and the results on their campuses.  Participants will also learn how the presenters’ departments successfully navigated these changes through the curriculum committee as well as issues that arose during the process of implementation and scaling.  (Student Success/Equity Strand)

Follow Up from Civic Engagement Panel

Martin Ramey, Mt. San Antonio College
Cynthia Reiss, West Valley College
Michelle Sampat, Mt. San Antonio College

This follow-up breakout session will give attendees the opportunity to dive more deeply into the issues surrounding civic engagement in curriculum and in our classrooms.  (Student Success/Equity Strand)

Local Plans and Curriculum Design

Karen Daar, Los Angeles Valley College
Jolena Grande, Cypress College
Diana Hurlbut, Irvine Valley College

Of the $200 million in Strong Workforce funding, 60% is allocated to colleges to invest in coordinated efforts to increase career technical education (CTE) enrollments and to improve the quality of CTE programs. This session will provide an overview of local planning efforts around curricular design and the important role curriculum committees play in ensuring the process is faculty-driven.  (CTE Strand)

Curriculum Specialists Roles and Responsibilities

Raul Arambula, Chancellor’s Office
Marie Boyd, Chaffey College
Njeri Griffin, Chancellor’s Office
Marilyn Perry, Sacramento City College

Curriculum specialists play an essential role in the college curriculum process, and the work can be daunting for those new to this role.  In this breakout, the role of a curriculum specialist is reviewed and helpful information on how to not only survive but to thrive in this position is provided by seasoned curriculum specialists.  (Basics Strand)

The Guided Pathways Program for California Community Colleges

Julie Bruno, ASCCC President
Darla Cooper, Research and Planning Group
Theresa Tena, Chancellor Office

The Guided Pathways Program is designed to support all 113 community colleges in implementing an overarching framework for institutional transformation to dramatically increase the number of students who successfully achieve their educational goals. The roll out of the program is expected to begin in late summer and early fall. This breakout will provide background and context for the Guided Pathways Program, as well as information about the program going forward.

Vendor: Succeeding on Purpose: Next Generation Curriculum Management Connecting Curriculum with Pedagogy and Planning

Matt Coombs, eLumen
 
There is ever increasing pressure to evolve curriculum in a timely manner that is compliant with the CCCCO and new initiatives like Guided Pathways. Now more than ever campuses need a modern system that automates notifications, actions, enforces rules and deadlines and integrated with other critical planning systems. eLumen's new Curriculum Management module is a complete, CCCCO customized, Course and Program managment system that finally delivers the integration with your assessment and planning systems, Program Review, and education planning. Come see how you are able to bring it all together to benefit your students and your campus.   
 

3:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Coffee Break

4:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Breakout Session 7

Curriculum Basics for Allies

Marie Boyd, Chaffey College
Michelle Sampat, Mt. San Antonio College

Curriculum must be a continuous priority on every campus and should involve the input and attention of faculty and administration, especially those who are not part of the curriculum committee. This session will focus on the communication links and processes necessary to ensure a smooth and balanced curriculum process on campus.  (Basics Strand)

Chancellor’s Office Curriculum Inventory

Mark Cohen, Butte Technology Center
Nili Kirschner, Woodland College
Craig Rutan, ASCCC 2017-18 Curriculum Chair

The new Chancellor’s Office Curriculum Inventory is finally in place and active.  This breakout will examine the current capabilities of the inventory and what colleges will be able to look forward to in the future.  (Statewide Issues Strand)

Distance Education Curriculum Issues

Michael Bowen, Ventura College
Stephanie Curry, Reedley College
Michael Heumann, Imperial Valley College

Attendees of this breakout will be informed about the requirements regarding curriculum for teaching courses in a distance education modality and will consider some examples of processes for approving courses to be offered via distance education. Discussion will include where course modality fits in the curriculum development and approval process, why distance education courses undergo a separate curriculum approval process, and what elements are important in that process that may not be a part of the normal development and approval process. (Effective Practices Strand)

Cultural Competency Across the Curriculum

Randy Beach, ASCCC South Representative
Dolores Davison, ASCCC 2016-17 Curriculum Chair
Cynthia Reiss, West Valley College

Having a sense of students’ capacity as learners and knowing that students learn and demonstrate their learning better in culturally sensitive learning environments is central to an institutional framework of equity and inclusion necessary for closing the success and persistence gaps for disproportionally impacted student populations. In a culturally-sensitive environment, students’ prior learning and experiences are central to the design of their instruction.  While this type of environment is laudable, faculty sometimes struggle with strategies to create it. In this breakout, practitioners will provide models and examples to consider when working to make progress in this area locally.  (Student Success/Equity Strand)

Apprenticeship

John Freitas, ASCCC Treasurer
John Stanskas, ASCCC Vice President
LeBaron Woodyard, Chancellor’s Office

Apprenticeship programs have increasingly garnered more attention from both the state and national governments as a means by which to provide paid workforce experience to students while they complete a role of study.  Curriculum design and review plays an important role in the development of apprenticeship programs that will meet the needs of industry and the colleges.  This breakout will provide the opportunity to dialog about effective practices for colleges in supporting rigorous and appropriate apprenticeship programs.  (CTE Strand)

Course Objectives to SLOS/PLOs/GELOs

Diana Hurlbut, Irvine Valley College
Ginni May, ASCCC North Representative
David Morse, ASCCC Past President

Student learning outcomes are expected to be statements of the impact of curriculum and teaching on students, as they measure what a student can do after experiencing curriculum developed by faculty. Yet, faculty still are challenged to see outcomes as a curriculum matter and more than ancillary to the course outline. In this breakout, presenters help connect the dots between objectives and outcomes at the course and program level in order to help faculty find more meaning and value in assessing outcomes.  (Effective Practices Strand)

Pathways and Ramping up to Career Technical Education (CTE)

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC North Representative
Kim Harrell, Cosumnes River College
Lorraine Slattery-Farrell, ASCCC South Representative

As part of the Doing What Matters campaign, the CTE Enhancement Funds of 2014, and the new Strong Workforce Funding, colleges need to work regionally to provide training programs that meet labor market demand. This breakout will present how the North and Far North region utilized research and collaboration to develop and support programs at three community colleges in one healthcare sector. These educational programs not only meet the cross-training needs of healthcare providers but actually feed enrollment between colleges.

Dual Enrollment and High School Articulation

Donna Greene, College of the Desert
Kim Schenk, Diablo Valley College
Michael Wyly, Solano College

With the passage of AB288 (Holden, 2015), changes to Title 5, and subsequent legislation, many colleges became interested in expanding their offerings to high schools.  While this process was occurring, several groups, including the ASCCC and the Chancellor’s Office, participated in workgroups designed to create effective practices and work with colleges to assist in developing dual enrollment opportunities as well as more streamlined high school articulation agreements.  This breakout will update participants on the status of dual enrollment programs around the state, both CCAP and non-CCAP programs, and the high school articulation Title 5 changes and will provide information and advice for those thinking about working more closely with their local high schools.  (GE/Pathways Strand)

Saturday, July 15th

8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. Breakfast

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Breakout Session 8

The Credit Hour (Repeated from Session Five)

Michelle Sampat, Mt. San Antonio College
Erik Shearer, Napa Valley College

The relationship between student learning hours and credit hours or units has been a topic of significant discussion.  This breakout will examine definitions of the credit hour, including how it is defined for college programs such as work experience, directed clinical study, and clock hour programs.  (Basics Strand)

Questions and Answers with the Chancellor’s Office Staff

Chancellor’s Office Staff

Have a burning question that you want to ask a member of the Chancellor’s staff?  The team from Academic Affairs and Student Services will be available to answer questions and field inquiries.  (Statewide Issues)

Pathways and Ramping into Credit

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC 2016 – 2017 Noncredit Committee Chair
John Freitas, ASCCC 2017 – 2018 Noncredit Committee Chair
Toni Parsons, San Diego Mesa College

Noncredit courses and programs can be used to create access for under-served populations. As an entry point, noncredit can lead to employment, but it can also lead to credit coursework in general studies, transfer studies, and technical education studies. This breakout will explore the ways in which noncredit can be used as part of a pathway toward credit or career, whether at a college that is exploring the formal structure of guided pathways or one just looking for a way to invite more students into credit.  (Noncredit Strand)

Career Technical Education (CTE) Hot Topics

Dianna Chiabotti, Napa Valley College
Lorraine Slattery-Farrell, ASCCC South Representative

Many hot topics are appearing around the 17% Committee, including college level data-driven planning for program development with respect to the Strong Workforce Program and the need to involve faculty and CIOs.  This breakout will consider how to involve the necessary stakeholders in CTE discussions and other issues and rumors regarding CTE curriculum. (CTE Strand)

General Education Bloat and Sequencing

Ginni May, ASCCC North Representative
Thais Winsome, Mission College

Faculty at all colleges should take a serious look at their general education course offerings and the sequencing of their course offerings. This breakout will provide information on requirements and good practices for course scheduling, which must be considered when determining general education course offerings and course sequencing. (Effective Practices Strand)

Where the CBA Meets Curriculum

David Morse, ASCCC Past President
Troy Myers, Sacramento City College
Michael Wyly, Solano College

The design and vetting of curriculum and the assigning of the appropriate unit value to a course is appropriately at the heart of any curriculum approval process. Yet, discord can occur where student and faculty load meet, and thus faculty workload considerations are a matter not just for curriculum design discussions but also for bargaining units. This breakout will highlight the effects of curriculum design on faculty workload and explore ways local curriculum committees might address issues related to faculty workload with union and administrative partners.  (Effective Practices Strand)

Breaking the Codes: TOP, CIP, SAM, CB, Oh My!

Michelle Grimes-Hillman, Long Beach City College
Craig Rutan, ASCCC 2017-18 Curriculum Chair

Courses and programs have required data elements that appear to be complex.   Join us for an explanation of the mysteries of the coding universe.  (Statewide Issues Strand)

Updates on the PCAH and Title 5

Nili Kirschner, Woodland College
Erik Shearer, Napa Valley College

The 6th edition of the Program and Course Approval Handbook (PCAH) is available. This breakout will cover the changes that are encompassed in the new PCAH along with the Title 5 changes necessary to support it.

10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. General Session

Training on Chancellor’s Office Certification

Dolores Davison, ASCCC 2016-17 Curriculum Chair
Jackie Escajeda, Chancellor’s Office
Virginia Guleff, Vice President of Instruction, Butte College
Pam Walker, Chancellor’s Office

Now that streamlining curriculum is taking place at the Chancellor’s Office, local curriculum committees, specialists, and administrators must be aware more than ever of their roles and responsibilities within the curricular process.  This session, which will feature the introduction of a training template, will provide chairs, specialists, and administrators with the information they need to ensure that their committees are ready to take on the responsibilities of local approval when the fall terms starts.

11:45 a.m. Closing Remarks

Dolores Davison, ASCCC 2016-2017 Curriculum Chair