Degree and Certificate Awards in Response to the New Funding Formula

Fall
2018
Resolution Number: 
09.01
Contact: 
Category: 
Curriculum

Whereas, The Student Centered Funding Formula that was enacted by the governor’s 2018-19 Budget Trailer Bill on June 27, 2018[1] provides monetary incentives for college districts to award the associate degree for transfer over a local associate degree, and when possible multiple degrees or certificates to a single student;

Whereas, The Student Centered Funding Formula may disadvantage smaller colleges that offer fewer local degrees or associate degrees for transfer than larger colleges, as well as colleges that lack robust degree audit programs, as auto-awarding degrees and certificates may be more difficult at such colleges;

Whereas, For students transferring to the University of California, a private institution, or an out-of-state institution, a local associate degree may provide better preparation than an associate degree for transfer; and

Whereas, An increase in the number of degrees or certificates a student is awarded should indicate additional qualifications attained by the student that are above and beyond the qualifications a student would earn from a single degree or certificate, and there are implications, known and unknown, with awarding students degrees and certificates that may impact their short-term and long-term educational opportunities;

Resolved, That the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges work with the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office and other stakeholders to support the efforts of colleges to best meet the educational goals of students in both awarding associate degrees and, when appropriate, guiding students through transfer preparation when the University of California or California State University does not require an associate degree;

Resolved, That the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges work with the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office and other stakeholders to provide guidance to colleges for awarding multiple degrees or certificates to a single student;

Resolved, That the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges urge local academic senates to work with their colleges to establish processes to ensure that no degrees or certificates will be auto-awarded without the expressed and informed affirmative consent of each student; and

Resolved, That the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges work with the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office and other stakeholders to advise local academic senates and curriculum committees about the effects on financial aid when auto-awarding degrees and certificates.

MSC